3 Greek Travel Myths that might surprise you!

Consumers warned against independent trips to Greece.

Greece More Expensive Than You Think

1. Greece is still more expensive for a one-week holiday than Portugal, Spain, Morocco, France and Egypt.

2. Greece ranked as only the 10th cheapest country for a seven-day holiday, including flights.

3.  In a recent pole Greece came out more expensive than even Iceland and Japan.

A consumer watchdog is urging holidaymakers considering trips to Greece to book packages to ensure their money is protected if the country exits the eurozone this summer.

Which? is warning its readers that packages booked through  tour operators are a safer bet than booking flights and accommodation separately, said a report in the Telegraph newspaper in the U.K.

It went on to say that holidaymakers who do book independent trips should pay by credit card, so they will be guaranteed refunds if things do go wrong, and to buy travel insurance with supplier failure cover.

A senior economist last week warned that tourists visiting Greece could face fuel and food shortages if the country defaults on its debt and abandons the euro, which prompted the Association of Greek Tourism Enterprises to highlight the value for money available to holidaymakers.

It is hoping that recent price reductions by hoteliers and restaurants will lure more tourists who might otherwise be put off by Greece’s financial and political instability.

However, a survey by travel search website Skyscanner today revealed that Greece is still more expensive for a one-week holiday than Portugal, Spain, Morocco, France and Egypt.

Greece ranked as only the 10th cheapest country for a seven-day holiday, including flights. When Skyscanner looked at the daily cost of living, it came in 17th place, making it more expensive than even Iceland and Japan.

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